Federal Reserve

Complex Theories May Confuse You About The Stock Market’s Hidden Risk

    In the 1997-2007 mortgage housing bubble the enablers of the bubble tried to rationalize using the Gaussian Copula theory that a Mortgage Backed Security holding mortgages from different states would act diversify the risk of a default. But that rationale was wrong because it was assumed that the successful borrowers would offset the damage caused by the losers. Instead the winners, who are borrowers, are not obligated to bail out the loser or to pay extra to the lender to make up for the loss caused by the defaulting borrower, so the “diversification” was bogus. A similar phenomenon is happening where financial experts assume the central banks can bail out the economy by cutting rates deeply. The problem is

2019-06-19T17:06:19-07:00June 19th, 2019|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on Complex Theories May Confuse You About The Stock Market’s Hidden Risk

If Stocks Crash Can The Federal Reserve Repair The Damage?

    When the recession comes, stocks will go down. The Fed can’t cut rates enough to prevent or heal a crash. Typically the Fed needs to cut rates by 5% in a crash; since they are now at 2.4% they would have to go to negative 2.6% which can’t be done without destroying the economy, and thus it won’t be cut to a negative rate. The intrinsic value of the SP is 1,800 (the peak was 2,954); the intrinsic value of the SP could even be as low as 1,100. If the Fed can only provide about half of the rate cuts needed to heal the next crash then perhaps stocks would get stuck at halfway between intrinsic value and

2019-05-16T13:33:54-07:00May 16th, 2019|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on If Stocks Crash Can The Federal Reserve Repair The Damage?

Can The Federal Reserve Prevent A Deep Stock Crash?

   The current stock market is a repeat of the irrational NiftyFifty stock market of 1973 with very high Price/Earnings ratios in the 1970’s which had nothing to do with low yields, bailouts, implied promises of Fed put options, corporate buybacks, QE, etc. – it was plain and simple irrational investor emotions in 1973 that created a stock bubble that lead to a crash. OK so the Fed did overstimulate in 1972 election but in those days it was a broadly dispersed benefit instead of today’s QE benefiting only stocks. It is tempting to feel a new era of permanently high PE’s has occurred but leaping to that conclusion is wrong as it is motivated by a desire to conform

2019-04-29T18:42:34-07:00April 29th, 2019|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on Can The Federal Reserve Prevent A Deep Stock Crash?

Investors Mistakenly Place Faith In Government’s Ability to Fix a Crash

       The great crash of 2008 was mainly based on failed financial markets where banks owned bad mortgages that had been falsely rated as investment grade. The non-financial part of the economy was not that badly hurt by the crash.     Some bullish advisors have leapt to the conclusion that financial assets, which can be difficult to fairly value, somehow incorrectly dropped in value in 2008 because of some irrational, unfounded panic for no reason. The claim is that because no one knows the future in terms of whether or not a mortgage borrower will be able to pay his loan each year for 30 years then perhaps it is impossible to fairly value a loan so why

2019-04-17T18:41:19-07:00April 17th, 2019|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on Investors Mistakenly Place Faith In Government’s Ability to Fix a Crash

Dramatic Policy Shifts By The Fed

   The Federal Reserve’s recent dramatic shift from tightening to implied loosening is the fastest shift of Fed behavior in 50 years. Some people have leapt to the conclusion that Fed chief Powell simply caved into pressure from Trump, betraying good hard money policies, and changed to easing because of Trump. The real reason for the easing is because Fed employees have researched and realized that the Fed and other central banks made many mistakes, including being too optimistic about economic recovery since the crash of 2008, so they want to be truly prepared for the coming recession. It is highly likely that economic cycles can’t last more than ten years. The current cycle was modestly extended by Trump’s tax

2019-03-22T19:02:14-07:00March 22nd, 2019|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on Dramatic Policy Shifts By The Fed

Big Rate Cut By Marketplace Today Hints At Stock Crash To Come

   Today the Federal Reserve held a two-day meeting and released a statement. They didn’t change their rates but the marketplace changed the rates dramatically downward. The ten year Treasury bond yield dropped from 2.61% to 2.525%, a drop of 8.5 basis points, several times a typical day’s movement. The technical traders who follow chart patterns have felt the rate might never go below 2.62% and would instead go above 3% and stay above that, thus the decline significantly below 2.62% is a shocking technical indicator matter, implying the “Invisible Hand” of the market “knows” that a recession will soon come. The futures market estimates a 50% probability of an eventual Fed easing of the Fed’s official rate. The drop

2019-03-20T18:01:03-07:00March 20th, 2019|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on Big Rate Cut By Marketplace Today Hints At Stock Crash To Come

Federal Reserve Ending QT Policy This Year

   The Federal Reserve intended to reverse the effects of Quantitative Easing by selling off its bond portfolio in an act called Quantitative Tightening (QT). The program started in late 2017. Only about 7% of assets were sold since then and now the Fed has suddenly decided to cancel QT this year. At this rate perhaps 11% of assets will have been sold, instead of the intended 100%. Most of the assets are intermediate term bonds or mortgage backed bonds that likely will “run off” (be prepaid) in a few years. The prepayment will occur if a recession triggers rate cuts that motivate borrowers to refinance, thus prepaying their loans. Thus, assuming a recession is coming soon, the portfolio will

2019-02-27T15:39:09-07:00February 27th, 2019|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on Federal Reserve Ending QT Policy This Year

QE And NIRP Monetary Policy is a Dangerous Trap

My concerns about QE: 1. It was a placebo that won’t work next time thus creating a surprise, not yet fully discounted by the stock market. 2. QE and associated polices of NIRP and bailouts, including the Japanese and Swiss central bank’s purchase of equities have created moral hazard that encourages speculators to operate in a riskier manner thus building up a higher degree of hidden risk that eventually will bubble to the surface and disrupt the economy. Imagine investors seeking to make income from writing naked put options. If they were lured into a false sense of security that they are entitled to a perma-bull fantasy of central banks bailout of markets then they may act recklessly and take

2019-02-20T19:26:13-07:00February 20th, 2019|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on QE And NIRP Monetary Policy is a Dangerous Trap

What Is The Proper Level For Rates?

  Regarding the concern that interest rates will rise to dangerously high levels, I doubt this will occur. The fear that Quantitative Tightening, where the Fed sells its holdings of bonds to undo QE, will make rates go up a lot is incorrect. When QE was implemented from 2009-2014 it didn’t create inflation and probably only lowered interest rates by 0.5%. The reason yields went down was because of global fears of falling into a debt/deflation trap and because other Developed countries (the EU, Japan, Scandinavia, Switzerland) had negative rates. I don’t see things getting better in Europe; probably the economic problems have not been truly solved in Japan. Thus since the fundamental reason for low yields in the U.S.

2018-11-05T17:54:35-07:00November 5th, 2018|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on What Is The Proper Level For Rates?

Unaffordably High Rates To Create Recession

   Considering how fragile the economy is and how moderate income people are hurt when they try to buy things using a loan then soon the damage from rising rates will result in recession. Yes, it is fair for the Fed to try to return to “normal” where real rates are 2% and the QE purchases are sold off in a QT program, but that won’t happen because we are in a brave new world of excessive debt balances. This means people simply can’t afford to pay higher rates.    The debt / GDP ratio went from about 150% during much of the past century, before 1996, to 365% today, a huge change. If you earned $50,000 in 1990 and

2018-10-25T14:19:54-07:00October 25th, 2018|mayflowercapital blog|Comments Off on Unaffordably High Rates To Create Recession